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Protest Writing

Protest Writing

Chart of Lesson Plans
Monday Wednesday Friday
Teach history of protest in World/America
- List of protests kids know
- Spectrum of protest – War
- In general, what makes people protest?

Teach methods of protest (song, essay, editorial, book, movie, picture, etc.)
- Show examples of book Letters From Young Activists

Make student list of personal protests (not too formal/grown-up…ex: driving age, dress code, gum)
- add to graphic organizer to hold for later in class
Start with protest close to our American hearts – Rev. War
- Show America Rocks “No More Kings”
- Divide class into 6 groups
- In each group, create a script for 1 of the boxes (ex: Slaves).
- As a group, write a mini-play/dialogue for the reasons behind the protest.
- Present plays to class
Experience: How Does the World Eat?
- Focus on World hunger problem

Also, include the book If the World Were a Village

- Mini-Lesson: How to write a Friendly Letter
- Work – write letter to friend on world hunger (r. draft)


***Buy food for class before!
TWO minilessons - 
1. Mini-Lesson: Types of Editing
- Self- Editing : do not generalize and use “always” – cite examples, word choice, audience
- Peer Editing – Do not edit out each other’s opinions.
2. Getting facts – quotations and citations

Homework – List 121 Persuasive Techniques – Use 1-2 techniques in friendly letter
Work – final draft on world hunger letter to friend



If done, Photos A – D from Chicago Historical Society on protests….


Homework – Bring in an example of a protest in our world or community today (newspaper article, etc.)
Create ceiling sign about protest today – 
- gather facts from newspapers, etc.
- create hanging ceiling sign to get people to listen…on sign write, “Any q’s about the issue – see _______”
Civil Right’s Movement: The Children’s March
- Watch movie and complete videosheet
- Do # 1 – 5 activity in which students label actual adult world problems
- Birmingham pledge
- Mini-Lesson: How to write a Business Letter
Work – write letter to Representative/leader about top issue. (r. draft)
Civil Right’s Movement: The Children’s March
- Watch movie and complete videosheet
- Do # 1 – 5 activity in which students label actual adult world problems
- Birmingham pledge
- Mini-Lesson: How to write a Business Letter
Work – write letter to Representative/leader about top issue. (r. draft)
Mini-Lesson: Proper Launch and audience

Peer, Self, and Adult Edit letter
Declarations of Independence
- Read children’s book on Declaration
- Discuss Declaration and format
- Discuss Women at Seneca Falls and Declaration
- Show examples
- Q’s to ask kids: ‘Who do you think treats you with prejudice?”; ‘What do you want from this?”
- Work – brainstorm list of people to “declare independence from”…move towards r. draft
Working on r. drafts and editing Declarations of Independence

Mini-Lesson: Organization of Dec. of Ind. ; and use of repetition vs. original sentence openers
Declarations of Independence classwork day


- If done may start on “Moving Through Protest” work
- Do clipboard
- Do pyramid
- Do research
“Moving Through Protest” – do all work (see lesson before) Analyzing Different Viewpoints
- piece of writing from the opposite perspective/both perspectives
- See sheet for essay ideas
Work – TWO rough drafts, side by side
Use of Accurate Statistics
- Read paragraph on Black vs. White prison statistics in Letters From Young Activists
- Students pick topic and find accurate statistics related to topic.
- Students must write paragraph properly including statistics – r. draft
Mini-Lesson: Tones
- Sarcasm and Anger vs. Logic and Even Tone

Editing: Putting in and/or taking out Sarcasm and Anger in Statistics paragraph
Mini-Lesson: Counterarguments
- Use Pro and Cons of Homework sheet
- Teach Counterargument at end of paragraph
Work – Edit Counterargument into one essay.
Choice Writing Assignments – see sheet
Choice Writing Assignments – see sheet Choice Project due

Protest songs lecture day
- overheads
- CD
- Packets
- HW: find own song to present (Ex. Cred. If song brought in)
Present Protest songs to class
Possible Other Assignments/Activities:
Protest Songs – The History of the Protest Song with John Fox (presenter and musician)
Protest Marches – Judy Dufficy
Letter to President Bush on War in Iraq (although rather unresponsive last year)